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drug policies david cameron

U.K Government Examines Antiquated Drug Policies

As most of us that are in-the-know are already fully aware, the government’s current drug policy regarding the use of marijuana for any dedication is a colossal disappointment at best.

But to have the government actually admit that their harsh anti-drug laws are indeed unsuccessful, encompassing no “obvious relation” with the exploitation of illegal substances, now that’s monumental.

A landmark document from the Home Office in the United Kingdom suggests that the existing structure of disciplinary drug law enforcement is defective.

The motion to debate the relevant subject was proposed by the Green Party’s Member of Parliament for Brighton Pavilion, Caroline Lucas, who made the demand that the coalition government of Prime Minister David Cameron attend to the expenses of the anti-drugs policy.

Which shouldn’t be a problem for Cameron and his crew considering his stance on the British government’s policy concerning drug use.

Back in 2002 he made an appealing proclamation about the ongoing anti-drug strategies that was published in a report from the Home Affairs Select Committee that called for a major shake-up of the government’s drugs policy titled “The Government’s Drugs Policy: Is it working?”.

“Drugs policy in this country has been failing for decades,” Cameron explained, then Conservative member of the Committee. “Drug abuse has increased massively, the number of drug-related deaths has risen substantially and drug-related crime accounts for up to half of all acquisitive crime. I hope that our report will encourage fresh thinking and a new approach. We need to get away from entrenched positions and try to reduce the harm that drugs do both to users and society at large.” I wholeheartedly agree, sir.

After Lucas’ motion for a deliberation regarding drug policy expenditures, the United Kingdom’s government conducted an examination of international drug laws involving the comparison of the current policies with that of 13 other nations, which documented aspects such as Portugal’s success with the decriminalizing of all drugs.

According to Liberal Democrat minister Norman Baker, who signed off on the aforementioned study with Conservative home secretary, Theresa May, the international evaluations regarding drug laws verified that “banging people up and increasing sentences does not stop drug use”.

In addition, Baker claims that the last 40 years had witnessed a drug policies dispute in Britain based on the “lazy assumption in the right-wing press that if you have harsher penalties it will reduce drug use, but there is no evidence for that at all”.

Concentrating on issues ranging from “zero tolerance” policies to options concerning decriminalization, the government’s document arrived at the conclusion that drug-related affairs are influenced by “more complex factors than the ones considered by the law and the security forces.”

Succeeding the release of the revolutionary report, British Minister for the Home Office Norman Baker declared the irrefutable material from the survey ought to lend a hand to bringing an end to the “senseless rhetoric” over drugs, encouraging new outlook and investigation on the topic.

Danny Kushlik, with the drugs charity titled Transform– which campaigns for the legalization of drugs, says that the international report symbolized “a historic moment in the development of UK drug policy”. Asserting that for the “first time in over 40 years the Home Office has admitted that enforcing tough drug laws doesn’t necessarily reduce levels of drug use”.

Finally, a little common sense from those that decide our fate via the laws they create. And to think that it only took 50 years. How prompt.

by Erik G

 

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